Thinking About the Weather

This week, everyone is talking about the weather. I’m not sure why, but when people talk about the weather, I find myself thinking about the song Like the Weather  by 10,000 Maniacs.

I get a shiver in my bones just thinking about the weather. A quiver in my lip as if I might cry.

Weather is something we all experience so it’s common ground. Extreme and harsh weather is such an obvious and easy topic that it as a reliable ice breaker. But can you talk about the weather in a way that makes it more than just a tired and worn out cliche? Can you be the person who stands out, even when talking about the weather is being done so much that it is starting to sound boring?

 You can be that more interesting person.

 DON”T BRAG: No one really wants to hear that you are enjoying warm weather if they are experiencing single digit temperatures and wind chills well below zero. Everyone gets their share of bad weather so be supportive and simply listen. It’s kinder and might eliminate the possibility that someone will be gloating to you when the season changes.

KEEP UP: It’s east to keep current with the variety of information on television, radio, the internet and your favorite weather APP. Know what the forecast is predicting and how that compares with the usual patterns. You can be the person who is informed.

NOT SO VERY BAD: Sometimes the only thing that can give a bad situation some perspective is to talk about a time when it has been worse. Can you remember a time when it was colder than this? Hotter than this? Wetter than this? More snow fell at one time than this? Extreme weather is not a new thing – it’s been around for a while, (ask anyone who had to walk 5 miles to school in 10 feet of snow, uphill, pulling their little brother in a wagon, while they were wearing cardboard shoes at least that’s how it is remembered!).

PERSONAL IMPACT: Yeah, the weather sucks, but how is it affecting you? Making the weather personal helps you pivot from a generic conversation to something that goes a little deeper. It’s nonthreatening disclosure that brings the conversation to something a bit more personal. What are you doing differently because of the weather? Did that different behavior reveal anything new and interesting to you?

Everyone talks about the weather. But you can be the person who moves a mundane conversation into something different and interesting. Most people don’t really want to talk about the weather anyway.

 

 

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